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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An …

Frederick Douglass is one of the most celebrated writers in the African American literary tradition, and his first autobiography is the one of the most widely read North American slave narratives. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave was published in 1845, less than seven years after Douglass escaped from slavery. The book was an instant success, selling 4,500 copies in the first four months. Throughout his life, Douglass continued to revise and expand his autobiography, publishing a second version in 1855 as . The third version of Douglass' autobiography was published in 1881 as , and an expanded version of was published in 1892. These various retellings of Douglass' story all begin with his birth and childhood, but each new version emphasizes the mutual influence and close correlation of Douglass' life with key events in American history.

SparkNotes: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

By the end of his , Douglass has resettled in New Bedford, Massachusetts, changed his name (which, until this time, was Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey), and married Anna Murray, a free black woman to whom he became engaged while still enslaved in Baltimore. In New Bedford, he is introduced to the members of William Lloyd Garrison's American Anti-Slavery Society. Douglass ends his narrative with a beginning, as he recalls his first public address before an audience of abolitionists. "From that time until now, I have been engaged in pleading the cause of my brethren," Douglass writes, leaving the future open for hopeful possibilities (p. ).

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Essay on the Life of Frederick Douglass - 1699 Words

's Narrative is not just about slavery. It is about that, of course; as a historical document, it paints a powerful picture of what it was like to be a slave, how the world looked from the bottom, and what kind of place America was when "the land of the free" was only free for white people. But while a lot of books were written by ex-slaves in the 1840s and 1850s, a lot of slave narratives read like documentaries, or worse, like Public Service Announcements. Frederick Douglass's narrative is by far the most important one, because he wants us to think about more than just the legal, historical, and political issues of slavery and freedom. He wants us to think about it as a philosophical question: what does it take for the human spirit to be free?

Douglass wants to show us that he made himself free. Freedom isn't something that's given to us; it's something we each have to find for ourselves. And although Douglass had it a lot harder than most of us ever will, we each have something to learn from his perseverance and courage in search of his own freedom, and his refusal to rest before finding it. One of the hardest lessons Douglass has to learn is that this battle never really stops. As long as anyone is a slave, Douglass knows he himself is not fully free. This is something that we can think about with regard to justice anywhere and anytime: can any of us be fully free if the least of us is oppressed?

Like many slave narratives, Douglass' is prefaced with endorsements by white abolitionists. In his preface, William Lloyd Garrison pledges that Douglass's Narrative is "essentially true in all its statements; that nothing has been set down in malice, nothing exaggerated" (p. ). Likewise, Wendell Phillips pledges "the most entire confidence in [Douglass'] truth, candor, and sincerity" (p. ). Though Douglass counted Garrison and Phillips as friends, scholars such as Beth A. McCoy have argued that their letters serve as subtle reminders of white power over the black author and his text. Indeed, in all of his subsequent autobiographies, Douglass replaced Garrison and Phillips' endorsements with introductions by prominent black abolitionists and legal scholars.

Frederick Douglass: Narrative - Analysis Essay Step 5

In Frederick Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Mr

Compare and contrast Equiano, The Interesting Narrative and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Rather than simply presenting a narrative or factual summary, each of these essays should forward a focused claim in two works we have read in this course and develop a well-supported argument with specific reference to the text(s)via quotations/citations from the texts read in this class. These essays must be a full five to seven double-spaced pages in length. GUIDELINES FOR PAPER WRITING (1) All papers must have a clear and concise thesis statement. (2) All papers must focus two texts we have read in this course by two different authors. (3) All papers must be five to seven FULL doubled spaced pages in length. (4) All papers must be written in MLA style and include a Works Cited page. (5) All papers must have a well thought out title and page numbers. (6) All papers must be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt font with 1’ margins all around (7) There must be no extra spaces between paragraphs and your name, date, etc. should be single spaced in the top left hand corner. (8) All papers must use textual evidence to support claims via use of paraphrases, direct quotes, etc. You may not use more than 2 offset quotes in your paper. (9) There must never be the familiar “you” in any paper, ever. (10) The use of outside/secondary sources is STRICTLY PROHIBITED

The publication in 1845 of the was a passport to prominence for a twenty-seven-year-old Negro. Up to that year most of his life had been spent in obscurity. Born on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Douglass escaped from slavery in 1838, going to New Bedford, Massachusetts. Here for four years he turned his hand to odd jobs, his early hardships as a free man being lessened by the thriftiness of his wife. In August 1841, while attending an abolitionist meeting at Nantucket, he was prevailed upon to talk about his recollections of slavery. His sentences were halting but he spoke with feeling, whereupon the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society lost no time in engaging him as a full-time lecturer. For the following four years the young ex-slave was one of the prize speakers of the Society, often traveling the reform circuit in company with the high priests of New England abolitionism, William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. Written by Himself
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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Essay | …

Still, there were many other powerful voices leading the country toward abolition, and none more prominent than Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave whose oral and written advocacy made him one of the era’s most visible social reformers. , appeared in 1845, the first of Douglass’s three autobiographies and likely the most famous American slave narrative ever published. The book found a wide transatlantic audience and went through many printings, but like most accounts of slave life it fell from favor as memory of the Civil War receded into myth and popular historical narratives tended toward reconciliation. The book eventually went out of print.

Frederick Douglass Essay - 1131 Words - StudyMode

Compare and contrast Equiano, The Interesting Narrative and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Rather than simply presenting a narrative or factual summary, each of these essays should forward a focused claim in two works we have read in this course and develop a well-supported argument with specific reference to the text(s)via quotations/citations from the texts read in this class. These essays must be a full five to seven double-spaced pages in length. GUIDELINES FOR PAPER WRITING (1) All papers must have a clear and concise thesis statement. (2) All papers must focus two texts we have read in this course by two different authors. (3) All papers must be five to seven FULL doubled spaced pages in length. (4) All papers must be written in MLA style and include a Works Cited page. (5) All papers must have a well thought out title and page numbers. (6) All papers must be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt font with 1’ margins all around (7) There must be no extra spaces between paragraphs and your name, date, etc. should be single spaced in the top left hand corner. (8) All papers must use textual evidence to support claims via use of paraphrases, direct quotes, etc. You may not use more than 2 offset quotes in your paper. (9) There must never be the familiar “you” in any paper, ever. (10) The use of outside/secondary sources is STRICTLY PROHIBITED

Narrative Life of Fredric Douglass Essay examples | Majortests

: Andrews, William, , Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1986; Blassingame, John W., and others, Eds., , Series Two, Vol. 1, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999; Douglass, Frederick, , Henry Louis Gates, Jr., ed., New York: Penguin Books, 1996; McCoy, Beth A, "Race and the (Para)Textual Condition," 121:1 (Jan 2006): 156-169.

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